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Big Boys Gone Bananas!*

In today's world, Big Boys Gone Bananas!* has become a topic of increasing interest to people of all ages and backgrounds. Whether it is a historical event, a famous figure or a natural phenomenon, Big Boys Gone Bananas!* has captured the attention and interest of millions of people around the world. In this article, we will further explore the impact and relevance of Big Boys Gone Bananas!*, examining its origins, implications and influence on different aspects of everyday life. Through detailed analysis, we hope to shed light on this topic and provide a clearer view of its importance in today's world.

Big Boys Gone Bananas!*
Film poster
Directed byFredrik Gertten
Written byFredrik Gertten
Produced byMargarete Jangård
Release dates
  • 19 November 2011 (2011-11-19) (IDFA)
  • 24 February 2012 (2012-02-24) (Sweden)
Running time
90 minutes
CountrySweden

Big Boys Gone Bananas!* is a 2011 documentary film, directed by Fredrik Gertten. The film is about how Gertten's film company was sued by Dole for the 2009 documentary film Bananas!*. This lawsuit is a type of case known as a strategic lawsuit against public participation (SLAPP).

Film

Big Boys Gone Bananas!* focuses primarily on the lawsuit, rather than the subject of worker exploitation or mistreatment that was the focus of Bananas!*.

The film concerns events that began when Dole sent a cease-and-desist letter to the filmmaker, the 2009 Los Angeles Film Festival, and the festival’s sponsors, that alleged that Bananas!* was false and defamatory, though the film had not yet been screened.

In June, a scathing review of Bananas!* appeared on the front page of the Los Angeles Business Journal. The Los Angeles Film Festival removed the film from the competition and screened it separately as a "case study" rather than a documentary. Many critics saw this procedure as undermining the original documentary's claims.

In July 2009, Dole filed a lawsuit for defamation against Gertten, claiming that Bananas!* did not show that the original lawsuit by the banana workers was thrown out of court: "To screen, promote, and profit from this film, despite the fact that its entire premise has been (judged) a fraud on Dole and California’s courts, is the epitome of reckless and irresponsible conduct." Multiple news organizations reported that entertainment lawyer David Ginsburg submitted a document on Dole's behalf that compared Bananas!* to anti-Semitic Nazi propaganda.

European channels screened Big Boys Gone Bananas!* and there was a threatened boycott of Dole fruits in Sweden. Dole withdrew the suit.

Gertten describes the film's themes thus:

Today, independent documentary films are more important than ever. These films are the last bastions of truth telling. Traditional media outlets have less money for investigative reporting and many are owned by corporate entities that have an influence on the news and its presentation and distribution.

Reception

The film was positively reviewed in major newspapers. Most reviewers described how the film demonstrated how easily media companies and journalists, especially in the United States, caved quickly to the threat of negative publicity generated by Dole's lawsuit. Numerous critics invoked the phrase "David and Goliath" in reference to the difference between an independent filmmaker and a multinational corporation.

One critic in the Los Angeles Times remarked that the film did not examine allegations of fraud against workers’ attorneys in the first film.

The review in The Hollywood Reporter described the film as "of limited commercial interest, though it raises issues with broad appeal." The film's Skype interviews with Gertten were also critiqued.

Film festivals

Awards

  • 2013: Runner Up for the People’s Choice Award at Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival

References

  1. ^ Sigander, Miranda (2 December 2011). "Revansch på Sundance för Gertten". Dagens Nyheter (in Swedish). Retrieved 2 December 2011.
  2. ^ Olivera, Roxana (April 6, 2012). "Big Boys Gone Bananas: a fight for the truth and freedom of speech". The Canadian Journalism Project : 6–7 – via Issuu.
  3. ^ a b c Catsoulis, Jeannette (2012-07-27). "Corporate Power Takes Aim at Independent Film". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-07-14.
  4. ^ a b c d Linden, Sheri (2012-08-03). "Review: Legal battles continue in 'Big Boys Gone Bananas!*'". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 2021-04-13. Retrieved 2021-07-14.
  5. ^ San Francisco Green Film Festival 2013 Program (2013). "Big Boys Gone Bananas!*". San Francisco Green Film Festival. Archived from the original on 2021-04-22. Retrieved 2021-07-14.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  6. ^ Honeycutt, Kirk (2009-06-22). "Slippery slope? "Bananas!*" a dubious documentary". Reuters. Retrieved 2021-07-15.
  7. ^ a b c Broeren, Joost, ed. (2011). "IDFA Catalogue 2011". Issuu. International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam. p. 134. Archived from the original on 2021-07-14. Retrieved 2021-07-14.
  8. ^ "The Big Slip-Up". Los Angeles Business Journal. June 8, 2009. Archived from the original on 2021-07-14. Retrieved 2021-07-14.
  9. ^ Hyland, Alexa (June 8, 2009). "The Big Slip". Los Angeles Business Journal. Vol. 31, no. 23. pp. 1, 41.
  10. ^ a b c "Big Boys Gone Bananas!: Film Review". The Hollywood Reporter. 2012-07-30. Archived from the original on 2021-07-14. Retrieved 2021-07-14.
  11. ^ Keating, Gina (2009-07-08). "Dole sues "Bananas" documentary maker". Reuters. Retrieved 2021-07-14.
  12. ^ "Dole Files Defamation Suit Against Filmmaker". Los Angeles Business Journal. July 8, 2009. Archived from the original on 2021-07-14. Retrieved 2021-07-14.
  13. ^ "News of the Week: Suit Filed". Los Angeles Business Journal. July 13, 2009. p. 4.
  14. ^ a b Anderson, John (2012-02-02). "Big Boys Gone Bananas*!". Variety. Archived from the original on 2015-09-20. Retrieved 2021-07-14.
  15. ^ Jones, Stacia Kissick (2012-08-08). "Big Boys Gone Bananas!*". Spectrum Culture. Archived from the original on 2015-06-29. Retrieved 2021-07-15.
  16. ^ Eisner, Ken (2012-08-29). "Big Boys Gone Bananas!* goes after the truth". The Georgia Straight. Archived from the original on 2012-12-12. Retrieved 2021-07-15.
  17. ^ "Attorney David Ginsburg takes new post". The Hollywood Reporter. 2009-03-10. Archived from the original on 2021-07-15. Retrieved 2021-07-15.
  18. ^ "Big Boys Gone Bananas: Kritik mot pr-byråernas makt och utstuderade metoder". Sveriges Radio (in Swedish). September 10, 2011. Archived from the original on 2021-07-15. Retrieved 2021-07-15.
  19. ^ a b c d Eva Elisabeth, VonAncken (Oct 1, 2013). "Big Boys Gone Bananas!* ". School Library Journal. Archived from the original on 2021-07-14. Retrieved 2021-07-14.
  20. ^ a b c Gertten, Fredrik (May 1, 2014). "Big boys gone bananas!*: FILMMAKER'S VIEW". Al Jazeera. Archived from the original on 2021-07-14. Retrieved 2021-07-14.
  21. ^ Brooks, Xan (2012-09-20). "Big Boys Gone Bananas – review". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2013-12-05. Retrieved 2021-07-14.
  22. ^ a b c Teplitsky, Ariel (2012-05-10). "Big Boys Gone Bananas: Yellow journalism". Toronto Star. Archived from the original on 2021-07-14. Retrieved 2021-07-14.
  23. ^ a b "PR Status Clipping Report for Big Boys Gone Bananas!* at the Hot Docs International Documentary Festival 2012". Issuu. Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival. 2012. Archived from the original on 2021-07-15. Retrieved 2021-07-14.

External links